[Untitled]

Title

[Untitled]

Creator

William H. Wharton

Date

1837-02-06

Language

English

Type

Letter

Author

William H. Wharton

Recipient

Sam Houston

Item Type

Letter

Book Title

Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas

Date

1837-02-06

Language

English

Pages

181-183

Text

(No.7.) WASHINGTON [CITY,] 6th Feb'y 1837
SIR,
Since my last nothing very important or definite has transpired, but appreciating your desire of being often apprised of the position and prospects of our Texas affairs, I will let no opportunity pass unimproved. A somewhat favourable development took place in the House of Representatives on thursday last. The motion of Mr. Boyd of K'y. to instruct the Committee on Foreign Affairs to report a resolution, recognizing the independence of Texas, was first in order. Mr. Cambreling moved to suspend the rules for the purpose of taking up the appropriation, which he said would consume very little time, and he added, moreover, that the Country was suffering hourly and greatly for the want of action on this bill. Notwithstanding the force of these remarks, and notwithstanding every member was convinced of the truth of them, yet seventy four sturdy friends of Texas refused to suspend the rules or to give any thing precedence of the motion to recognise our independence, and two thirds not being in favor of suspending, Mr. Cambreling's motion was lost. All of the 74. are considered our devoted friends and I know of many equally devoted friends both of recognition and annexation who voted with Cambreling on account of the great importance of immediate action on the appropriation bill. After this, the House adjourned. Friday and Saturday being private bilI days, Mr. Boyd's motion did not come up. Nor will it be reached on monday, that being Petition and Memorial day. It will however be first in order on tuesday, and I anticipate an interesting discussion and a favourable decision. The reasons, assigned in my last, as inducing Mr. Van Buren's friends to desire postponement, cannot be urged in debate, and I am of the opinion, that, when the subject is agitated, they will not oppose our recognition, for that would be to proclaim their leader the enemy of Texas, in which light he is not willing to be viewed, especially as the friends of our much mistreated country are so numerous and respectable and zealous in all parts of the United States. Senator Preston has just assured me that the Senate will take up the subject in a few days. That body is considered more certainly friendly to us than the lower House. I repeat it now that the views of the President are known to be favourable: discussion is all that is necessary. Our claims to immediate recognition are so palpable and paramount that no prominent politician of the South or West, or of the dominant party in any quarter, dare openly oppose it, however much he may secretly desire to prevent the agitation of the question altogether at this session of Congress. Moreover there is one consolation which I fondly clasp to my bosom as the pillar of my hope and support amid all the coldness, illiberality and injustice, with which we have been treated, which is that if Genl. Jackson finds that Congress will not act without another message from him, I am more deceived in him than I ever was in mortal man, if he does not under these circumstances send another message to Congress and have us formally recognized before he quits the Presidential Chair. Time will soon develope the truth or falsity of my hopes and calculations. The news from Vera Cruz up to the 9th. Jan'y is favourable for us. There is but little doubt of the reinstation [sic] of Santa Anna in power and of the utter impracticability of the threatened invasion. When I wrote you last, I confidently expected to have an operation for the cataract, immediately performed on Mrs. Wharton's eye, so as to be ready to start home in March, provided you gave me leave to return. Since then I have consulted Dr. Smith of Baltimore, who, to my infinite sorrow, informs me, that an operation would be entirely useless, the sight having been destroyed by paralysis of the optic nerve before the appearance of this cataract. Under these circumstances, he says an operation would not restore her vision at all, and would at the same time greatly endanger her other eye. He says moreover that it is indispensably necessary that Mrs. Wharton should spend the summer at the Saratoga and White Sulphur Springs. Perhaps her life may depend upon it. I cannot therefore, to my inexpressible regret, spend the summer in Texas, even if I obtain your leave. I might possibly leave here in March and attend our Congress in May and return in time for the Springs.
I think it might be of service for me to be at our next Congress. I could tell more orally in one day about our hopes and prospects in this quarter than I could by writing for six months. Do with me as you please however. I assure you of one thing, the Govt. shall not be charged with my expenses when I am absent, or when I am not exclusively and devotedly attending to its business. If you will leave me a little discretion about my movements, I call God to witness, that, without reference to my private business, I will come or stay, as may in my judgment best advance the interests and honour of Texas.
The President has not yet sent in his message, recommending the granting of letters of Marque against Mexico. I anticipate his doing so tomorrow, for he informed me that his mind was unequivocally made up on the subject. I do not think that Congress will concur in his recommendation. Pity and contempt for the imbecility of Mexico will induce many to differ with the President. Moreover the commercial interest will in mass object from a fear of having the ocean crowded with privateers of other countries, sailing under Mexican colors and commissions. The contest in this case would be very unequal; Mexico having no commerce to be preyed upon, while that of the United States whitens every sea. My own opinion is that the evils, resulting from a temporary suspension of commerce with Mexico, would be more than counterbalanced by its superior security in future. Again, the conclusion of the war would afford a favourable opportunity of extending by treaty the at present open South Western boundary of this Government to the Rio del Norte, with the assent of Mexico and of Texas.
I have the honour to be with the highest consideration,
Yours etc.
WH. H. WHARTON

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Citation

William H. Wharton, “William H. Wharton to Sam Houston, Feburary 2, 1837,” Familiar Strangers, accessed April 24, 2019, http://www.davidmckenzie.info/projects/items/show/5.

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Item Relations

This Item Is related to the person Item: Almonte, Juan Nepomuceno
This Item Is related to the person Item: López de Santa Anna, Antonio
This Item Is related to the place Item: Washington, District of Columbia, USA

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